Saturday, May 31, 2014

June 27,2014 -- Ulysses by James Joyce


We will discuss the first eight six chapters of "Ulysses" by James Joyce at our next meeting. We plan to discuss the rest of the book at our next two meetings in July and August.

Meeting Information:
Location: Kansas City Public Library, Plaza Branch, Small Meeting Room
Address: 4801 Main Street, Kansas City, MO
Date: June 27, 2014
Time: 7:00 PM

4 comments:

Clif Hostetler said...

Tim Thurman has informed me that the book "Ulysses" has 18 chapters, not 24 as I had announced at our last meeting. Therefore, our meeting in June will cover the first 6 chapters (i.e. 1/3 of the book for each month of the summer).

Tim also provided the following information:
The book of 18 chapters does cover 24 hours of one day, but the chapters are not in chronological order! James Joyce didn't even number or name the chapters, however scholars have subsequently added numbers.

Clif Hostetler said...

Since I have assigned the first six chapters, I feel that it is my responsibility of explain where the chapter divisions are for those of you who have a copy of "Ulysses" with no chapter designations. This link contains a detailed description of the chapter divisions.
Those of you who are intimidated by the large size of the book will be glad to hear that the assigned reading for the June meeting (Chapters 1 through 6) contains only 115 pages.
LINK TO CHAPTER DESCRIPTIONS

Clif Hostetler said...

The following links may be of assistance in understanding what's going on while reading Ulysses:
INTRODUCTION AND OVERVIEW
CHAPTER ONE
CHAPTER TWO
CHAPTER THREE
CHAPTER FOUR
CHAPTER FIVE
CHAPTER SIX

Clif Hostetler said...

Report on last night's meeting, July 27:
Seven people were present for our discussion of Ulysses by James Joyce.
The following summary comments give an idea of the diversity of responses to the book:
1. I can't believe I read this in College.
2. I thoroughly enjoyed reading it (so far).
3. It was a life changing experience when i first read it 25 years ago.
4. I didn't like it.
5. It needs to be read as poetry.
Those present included Tim Thurman, Marty Hattan, Jan Carter, Tom Brown, John Rasmus, Jack Granath, and Clif Hostetler